Sunday, December 21, 2008

Death & The Mirror


Upon reflection.

7 comments:

Steven Ball said...

Yes it's the choice of film (dodgy cult cinema icons of the 20th century) and arrangement (the 'mexican wave' effect) of 'samples' that makes the difference: like hearing a sample in a piece of music the effect relies on simultaneously recognising the original and appreciating it as affect in its recontextualised form. The arrangement and intervals seems to be becoming a sort of proforma grid that can be applied to any number of scenes from any number of movies.

Philip Sanderson said...

"Dodgy cult icons" indeed, but yes "the effect relies on simultaneously recognising the original and appreciating it as affect in its recontextualised form." is indeed what I was seeking to achieve. This re-viewing of the existing offering a more productive path than say cronocutting footage of natural phenomena or other time slicing favourites. Interesting how it has the effect (probably temporary) of making one more aware when you next watch conventional footage of camera angles, cuts etc. ~There is also something in the way so much footage becomes a series of intersecting posed body movements and eye close ups, very pose art.

Steven Ball said...

Well it certainly an improvement on the original Orpeé! I guess in that respect the fractional intervals between the spatially presented body fragments are forensic in the way that Muybridge photos were of 'natural' human movement, but in this case accentuating the 'unnatural' theatricality. Back to Martin Arnold in some regards, although his repetition is exclusively temporal rather than spatio-temporal.

Steven Ball said...

PS I'll see if I can dig out a piece I wrote about Orpheé some years ago...

Steven Ball said...

there you go:
http://www.steven-ball.net/dandy.html

Philip Sanderson said...

Take it you are not that fond of it then...

Steven Ball said...

Ha ha, well that was the reaction 12 years ago, which would be the last time I saw it. I might just contrarily hail it as a masterpiece today. Hmm, nope, can't bear the thought of Cocteau so I suspect I would still prefer your détournement.

I also wrote something about 'If....' around that time, but I'll resist the temptation to inflict that on you.