Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Bournville


A repost of a piece to mark a sad day for chocolate and the proud Bournville tradition - expect sweeter chocolate and less jobs.

11 comments:

Steven Ball said...

chocodelica

ps said...

chocodelicia perhaps?

Steven Ball said...

psychocolate

SAM RENSEIW said...

Ah!
what a fine subliminally blended message, with a pinch of duchamp, vertigo, 007 trailer(s), all cad-burried.
with a square shape, this video would make it as: quadratisch.praktich.gut.
(http://www.ritter-sport.de/index_flash.html)
or
roto-refief with chocolate grinder, milk added.
tout-fait !
(http://www.toutfait.com/)
or
callories for anemic cinema

ps said...

Well Sam as usual you have unpicked the threads and influences. I was indeed thinking of the Bond opening sequences whilst making this confectionary and even experimented with some similar music, but the chocolate piston ( a nod as you say to MD's grinder) pulled me back to the swirl of the flake and then the web kindly provided some music from a 1960's flake advert which with a little treatment became the soundtack.

Steven Ball said...

interesting I'd never really thought about MD's rotoreliefs, etc as perhaps the first, certainly proto-psychedelia, but of course, post-Riley and the Vertigo record label... not that being the first to do something is particularly significant and I'm probably not the first to make the Duchamp/psychedelic observation, not that being the first to do something.... etc Rrose is Rrose is Rrose.... etc

ps said...

Well there is something of an anomaly in that the rotoreliefs could be seen as in a sense a purely optical experience, something of course which MD had argued against strongly in painting. MD did of course originally try to sell them as a commercial product at a trade fair where they were a huge flop. But this positioning suggests that perhaps the rotoreliefs should be seen as part of a longer tradition of artists trying to market (usually unsuccessfully) kinetic visual apparatus, often based on some type of colour organ.

In that sense the term psychedelic makes some sense but I think it is currently too closely associated with a certain period in the late 60s and with drug taking to be much use in a wider context. The best psychedelic art was tightly controlled in its abandon but the general perception is of something loose and formless without much resonance once the stimulant s have gone which is why probably most filmmakers from the period are reluctant to talk of their work as being psychedelic.

SAM RENSEIW said...

well, one thing for certain: chocolate is delightfully addictive :-)

Recipe for Chocolate Truffes (au chocolat noir-Intense and very chocolaty, a truffle is a soft, melting ganache simply powdered with cocoa. )

• 700 g (24.5 oz) Noir Gastronomie VALRHONA
• 500 g (2 cups) whipping cream
• 100 g (7 tablespoons) butter
• powdered cocoa

Chop the chocolate and put it into a bowl. Bring whipping cream to a boil. Pour the boiling hot cream a bit at a time over the chopped chocolate, stirring with a whisk. When the cream is incorporated completely and the mixture is perfectly smooth, add butter to the ganache, bit by bit, while smoothing with an immersion blender.

When this mixture is finished, keep it in a covered plastic container in the refrigerator for several hours.

To make the truffles, dip a melon-baller in hot water and shake off the excess. Make small balls out of the ganache, then roll them in powdered cocoa—VALRHONA, of course.

Keep your truffles in a cool place, or refrigerate them, until you are ready to eat them.

Source : Ecole du grand Chocolat /Valrhona

ps said...

I shall mix up that chocolate formula right now and indulge the addiction.

Steven Ball said...

don't forget to sprinkle in some dried psilocybins

Anonymous said...

I feel thoroghly hypnotised, i'm off to buy a flake. Ax